LOCAL NEWS

Today is World Heart Day

World Heart Day is today and its purpose is to focus on preventative measures that one can follow to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. The Montgomery County Health Department promotes the Wellness Begins With Me Initiative. Throughout the development of the Montgomery County Community Health Improvement Plan community leaders have committed to improve overall health in our community, including cardiovascular disease.

Improving health in Montgomery County begins at the individual and family level. Having a basic understanding of health and wellness goes a long way in improving the quality and length of life for a family. Instilling healthy habits in our youth is important for them to develop properly, succeed in school, and contribute to society as adults. Understanding proper nutrition, being active and having healthy relationships allow for families and communities to prosper.

There are several steps you can take to begin taking control of your cardiovascular health such as:

• Getting 30 minutes of exercise a day

• Incorporating fruits and vegetables into every meal

• Not using tobacco products

Below is a list of local events that you can participate in to help to improve your cardiovascular health:

• Youth Service Bureau Funky 5k on Oct. 8

• Crawfordsville Park & Rec’s Thanksgiving Day Pie Run on Nov. 24

• Crawfordsville Farmer’s Market on Pike Street 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays 

• Indiana’s Tobacco Quitline 1-800-QUITNOW

For additional resources you can refer to the Montgomery County Health Profile for local statistics and data on current health issues in Montgomery County posted at www.montgomeryco.net.

IFB makes donation to FFA Foundation

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana Farm Bureau Inc. and Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance donated $25,000 to the Indiana FFA Foundation. This is a match for donations to the Pay It Forward campaign to retire the original loan on the Indiana FFA Leadership Center and continue to build the Give Hope Annuity which is the fund created to help with future capital projects of the Indiana FFA Leadership Center, located in Trafalgar.

“Few organizations can compare to FFA when it comes to preparing future leaders for our industry,” said Randy Kron, who serves as president of Indiana Farm Bureau Inc. and Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance. “We’re honored to support the place where Indiana’s FFA members learn and are inspired to grow.”

Since the first camp was held in 1974, an estimated 100,000 FFA members have taken advantage of the unique FFA Leadership Center. On that hallowed ground, generations of leaders have been shaped and inspired. For over 40 years Indiana FFA members have been blessed to inherit such a remarkable place to call home.

In the past five years the Leadership Center has been in a place of growth and stability. With the Indiana FFA Foundation investing close to $500,000 in facility capital projects and improvements, the Indiana FFA Leadership Center is excited about their future and what it can offer youth across Indiana.

The Indiana FFA Foundation builds partnerships with industry, education, government and individuals to secure financial resources that support the efforts of the Indiana FFA Association, recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of agriculture education for close to 12,000 student members in grades seven through 12 who belong to one of the over 200 local FFA chapters across Indiana. Governed by a 16-member board of directors comprised of business leaders, educators and individual donors, the foundation is a separately registered nonprofit organization. The Indiana FFA Leadership Center’s mission is to provide a facility for leadership training and personal enrichment for a broad range of clients, with a primary focus on serving Indiana’s youth. For more than 40 years, the Leadership Center has provided a facility for leadership training for Indiana FFA members. For more information, visit the Indiana FFA Foundation at www.inffa.org/foundation.

Prev Previous Pocketing A Success A large crowd turned out for Montgomery County’s first India… Next Next Up MCCF awards more grants Eight non-profit organizations received grants from the Mont… Inaugural Day of Giving wins big for United Fund

Back in June, it was an idea so crazy it just might work. At the end of September, the staff and volunteers for the Montgomery United Fund For You learned just how well it actually worked.

MUFFY’s inaugural 24-Hour Day of Giving hit Montgomery County on Wednesday, and it became a quick success, raising $87,504.11 for the organization and the 18 nonprofit agencies it supports.

The MUFFY 2016 campaign team originated the idea of a 24-Hour Day of Giving in late spring, after discussing how the length of previous fundraising campaigns were proving to be taxing on volunteers as well as staff. A plan was devised with the bulk of MUFFY’s special events being condensed into a Drive Week that culminated with a 24-Hour Day of Giving, to build excitement and

momentum while keeping volunteer commitment to a manageable level.

“The Day of Giving was a great way to kick off this year’s MUFFY campaign,” said David Johnson, MUFFY’s executive director. “We are well on our way to meeting our 2016 goal of $435,000. We are incredibly grateful for the businesses and individuals whose generosity and genuine care for Montgomery County made this effort a success.”

Local banks Hoosier Heartland State Bank and Teachers Credit Union made it easy for individual givers to contribute to MUFFY’s “Elevate Montgomery County” campaign during the Day of Giving. HHSB hosted donation centers at each of its five Montgomery County locations, as well as raising more than $16,000 among their employees for a second consecutive year.

TCU created a donation station that made it fun for its members to give, with freshly-popped popcorn, engaging employees and giveaways for donors at every level. Donors who gave above a certain amount were entered into a drawing for a fantastic prize package.

“Several members of the campaign team and I ran from one side of the county to the other, collecting donations and thanking people,” Johnson said. “It was such a boost to see not only how much money we raised, but how passionate people are around here about helping their fellow residents. It reminds me how fortunate we are to live in Montgomery County.”

Donations can still be made in a number of different ways. Donations can be brought to MUFFY’s office on the second floor of the MainSource Bank building, 221 E. Main St.; or be made online at MUFFY’s website at www.muffy.org; and on their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/muffyhelps

For more information, contact the MUFFY office at 765-362-5484.

The Day of Giving closes MUFFY’s first Drive Week, which began on Sept. 21 with their Kickoff Luncheon and Golf Scramble, continued on Sept. 22 with the Wabash Residential Drive and on Sept. 24 with the “Battle of the Badges” softball championship. Recaps from those events can also be found on www.muffy.org.

Inaugural Day of Giving wins big for United Fund

Back in June, it was an idea so crazy it just might work. At the end of September, the staff and volunteers for the Montgomery United Fund For You learned just how well it actually worked.

MUFFY’s inaugural 24-Hour Day of Giving hit Montgomery County on Wednesday, and it became a quick success, raising $87,504.11 for the organization and the 18 nonprofit agencies it supports.

The MUFFY 2016 campaign team originated the idea of a 24-Hour Day of Giving in late spring, after discussing how the length of previous fundraising campaigns were proving to be taxing on volunteers as well as staff. A plan was devised with the bulk of MUFFY’s special events being condensed into a Drive Week that culminated with a 24-Hour Day of Giving, to build excitement and

momentum while keeping volunteer commitment to a manageable level.

“The Day of Giving was a great way to kick off this year’s MUFFY campaign,” said David Johnson, MUFFY’s executive director. “We are well on our way to meeting our 2016 goal of $435,000. We are incredibly grateful for the businesses and individuals whose generosity and genuine care for Montgomery County made this effort a success.”

Local banks Hoosier Heartland State Bank and Teachers Credit Union made it easy for individual givers to contribute to MUFFY’s “Elevate Montgomery County” campaign during the Day of Giving. HHSB hosted donation centers at each of its five Montgomery County locations, as well as raising more than $16,000 among their employees for a second consecutive year.

TCU created a donation station that made it fun for its members to give, with freshly-popped popcorn, engaging employees and giveaways for donors at every level. Donors who gave above a certain amount were entered into a drawing for a fantastic prize package.

“Several members of the campaign team and I ran from one side of the county to the other, collecting donations and thanking people,” Johnson said. “It was such a boost to see not only how much money we raised, but how passionate people are around here about helping their fellow residents. It reminds me how fortunate we are to live in Montgomery County.”

Donations can still be made in a number of different ways. Donations can be brought to MUFFY’s office on the second floor of the MainSource Bank building, 221 E. Main St.; or be made online at MUFFY’s website at www.muffy.org; and on their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/muffyhelps

For more information, contact the MUFFY office at 765-362-5484.

The Day of Giving closes MUFFY’s first Drive Week, which began on Sept. 21 with their Kickoff Luncheon and Golf Scramble, continued on Sept. 22 with the Wabash Residential Drive and on Sept. 24 with the “Battle of the Badges” softball championship. Recaps from those events can also be found on www.muffy.org.

Salvation Army looking for bell ringers

Calling all bell ringers. 

The local Salvation Army is looking for volunteers to man its bell ringing stations during the holiday season.

Last year the organization raised a record $58,000, which is used exclusively for needs in Montgomery County. This year the goal is $60,000.

“Two things make our campaigns successful,” said Jan Sears, board member. “First, we need plenty of volunteers, and second we need generous

members of the community.”

Volunteers will be needed at five locations, including both Kroger stores, Big R, Walmart and County Market. Bell ringing is scheduled to begin Nov. 18 and will continue through Dec. 24. As it was last year, there will be no bell ringing on Sundays.

Nearly 600 bell ringers from 30 churches, area organizations and local businesses helped last year. Board members are hopeful that more groups will join the effort this season. Each scheduled day for ringing consists of five time slots.

Bell ringers can go solo or in groups. Some families make it a tradition to ring for the Salvation Army as a way to give back to the community. 

Board members appreciate all those who make it a point to ring a bell at the large red kettles. However, for board member Brenda Deckard, there is a group of people she appreciates maybe even a little more.

“It is wonderful to see people from the community who have received help from the Salvation Army decide to come ring a bell,” Deckard said. “Also, when someone comes up and places money in the kettle and they say they were helped once and now they want to give, it is heart warming.”

The board uses the money collected during the holidays to help individuals get through emergencies year-round. The Salvation Army will make checks payable to vendors to cover rent, prescriptions, food costs, utilities and other emergency needs. 

The total amount is budgeted throughout the year to ensure funds are available each month. A total of 185 families have been helped so far in 2016.

Board member Barry Lewis said he and his daughter have volunteered at a kettle the last few years. He said the effort to volunteer is meaningful.

“Ringing the bell makes me feel I am really doing something,” Lewis said. “I think what I get out of it is as much as the people we help.”

Anyone interested in participating this year should contact their church pastors or call Sears at 765-362-3055. If no answer, leave a message.

“The only requirements for bell ringers is that they have a willing spirit and a warm coat,” Deckard said.